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's understanding that al qaeda still posed a threat, a different threat from the one that we were used to with bin laden but a threat nonetheless, i think the answer increasingly yes s yes. they didn't want the public to see that effort as anything other than a great success. that was part of obama's appeal. so i'd say on the particular details, i don't see much. on the broad theme, did they want the public to feel al qaeda was down for the count? yes, i think they did. >> rose: we conclude with julian sands, a british actor, talking about harold pinter, the english playwright and nobel laureate. >> in comparison with harold, other people looked blurred because he was such a life force. he was so present. he was so forceful. and he lived by pure intention. >> rose: aluf, dvid ignatius and julian sands when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin with attacks by israel and hamas. in israel, three civilians have been killed and dozens wounded, hamas has fired more than one thousand rockets into israel, many o
broadwell all of this access. all of us had access to general petraeus over the years when he wants us around and tell us something. but this was different. he really allowed her to go everywhere with him. he talked to her all the time. i've talked to many aides, they were concerned about it in afghanistan. they were concerned how it looked, the optics of having this woman all the time. they described her as gushy and inapoprie tkingbout his thoughts. you've seen her on several programs over the last week. and things she was saying about him. that made them uncomfortable. >> well like martha, i've known him for about a decade, covered him in these war jones. he's a disciplined man, a man with incredible force of will. as much as we talk about his counterinsurgency doctrine, when i think about what happened in iraq, it was really david trae' will pow inhat battle space in the way he changed people's expectations what was possible, what was striking. so to see a man of that intensity get involved with another very intense person paula broadwell, i'm surprised by the lack of discipline. y
' contributions to his country, and also said-- i'm not sure the exact word he used-- but basically no top vent intelligen was revealed. >> i think he made a point of saying so far. and so far, there is not any negative effect on national security. but this investigation is clearly still open. you have hagents going into paula broadwell's house, taking out boxes, taking out her computer. they are still looking for classified material. whatever too soon maybe it was something for the book. maybe it's a schedule that's classified. you know how this works. everything in th mitarys practically classified including weather reports. i've sat through briefings and it's classified. in terms of it being illegal, if she has classified material in her home, it is illegal. now, she had a clearance. she could read classified material, but not in her home. they've now yanked her security clearance we just learned this evening while this investigation continues. but she shouldn't have had classified material. i think what they're talking about is in terms of so far, they haven't seen, you know, pillow talk i
. >> they made sure that she used this hood when she put it over her head. >> narrator: the jana van voorhis case would be the first trial since the days of dr. kevorkian to test the nation's laws prohibiting assisted suicide. >> let's take a look inside, exhibit 91. >> narrator: a guilty verdict in arizona could mean the end for final exit network. >> they knew exactly what they were doing. >> the final exit network does not aid people in committing suicide. they provide information, they provide comfort, and that is all that they do. >> narrator: but in a move that was seen as a shocking betrayal, wye hale-rowe, one of the network's most experienced exit guides, pled guilty to a lesser charge and agreed to testify for the prosecution. >> were you talking to ms. van voorhis about suicide? >> i talked to her about hastening her death, yes. >> one day, i forced myself to read through the statute over and over again. at about the fourth time, i was convinced that i would fry. i mean, i really thought that i would be found guilty. i thought the spirit of the statute included any kind of thing that c
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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